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Smallwares

BauscherHepp Scope Collection

Scope Collection by BauscherHeppToday, we introduce you to a brand new collection from BauscherHepp – Scope. This collection may be familiar to you, as BauscherHepp featured it in their  National Restaurant Association Show Overview, which we shared with you a few weeks ago. But today, we are sharing just a little more information about Scope’s story!

Scope is an all new collection from BauscherHepp with a fresh silhouette. Additionally, the embossment draws inspiration from one of Bauscher’s Noble China collections: Purity Finest Loom. Made from German hard porcelain, it pairs perfectly with Bauscher’s Options collection. The collection features soft pastel shades of white, taupe, and delicate blue-green, which creates the perfect platform for chefs to experiment with new food trends in their own style. Further, the Scope collections offers an interplay of embossed and smooth pieces for a dazzling, modern rustic aesthetic

You can see more of Scope, and all the new items in BauscherHepp’s monthly Novelties Guide.

 

BauscherHepp NRA Show Collections

BauscherHepp NRA show collectionsDid you know that the opening day for the National Restaurant Association Show in Chicago would have taken place this past weekend? Due to obvious reasons that didn’t happen this year, but our factory partners from BauscherHepp didn’t want you to miss out. So they have created a mini catalog, which highlights some of the collections that BauscherHepp would have introduced at the NRA show.

We are thrilled to share the catalog with you! It includes new vintage-inspired glasses from Luigi Bormioli. Asymmetrical bone white china from Bauscher. Versatile stoneware from Playground that serves a dual purpose. You can view the BauscherHepp NRA Show Collection here.

Bauscher Hepp will send out more of these mini catalogs, as they launch even more new products, and we will of course share them with you.

In the meantime – please stay safe and healthy and we look forward to seeing all of you in Chicago next year for the National Restaurant Association Show!

And, if you need any help to get you through this crisis, BauscherHepp is continuously updating their Covid-19 resource page. It is a page that contains a list of national and regional resources, aid and ways everyone can continue to help. You can find out more by clicking on this link!

 

Five Ways Restaurants Can Stretch Food Budgets

Five Ways Restaurants Can Stretch Food BudgetsA few weeks ago, our factory partners Hamilton Beach Commercial shared five ways for restaurants to stretch food budgets further. The post really highlights some great tips, especially in this time, when everything is so unpredictable. We decided to share the information with you as well, so read on for more information!

1. Start processing food the second it’s delivered. 

In the best of times, it’s tough for kitchen staff to drop everything to deal with incoming deliveries. When the restaurant is understaffed and overwhelmed, it’s even tougher. But Sandra D. Ratcliff, CEC, a longtime chef and director of healthcare sales for The Hansen Group, says the best thing to do, is to “take care of your produce. when it first comes in.”

Ratcliff’s recommendation is to designate a team member to immediately deal with deliveries, even if you’re short-staffed, . The cost savings will easily pay for that extra person. When a case of iceberg lettuce arrives, don’t leave it in the dirty cardboard box that’s been sitting in a farm field. Wash it and vacuum-seal it: “You’ve automatically gotten an extra three weeks out of a product.” The same goes for other ingredients: fresh fish, meat, cheese, etc.

Another benefit of vacuum-sealing is visibility. When stored in cardboard or other opaque packaging, it is easy to forget the food, which then can lead to rot! Once vacuum-sealed, it’s easier to see and use. Just remember that it’s essential to follow food safety guidelines for vacuum-packed foods, and train kitchen staff in safe handling practices.

2. Increase order sizes. 

In the face of so much uncertainty, it seems counter intuitive to order larger quantities of food. That’s exactly what Ratcliff recommends, however. Especially because many restaurant supply companies have cut back their deliveries to just one or two per week. Operators can save a significant amount of money on food, if they order large quantities of ingredients, then process and portion them. Get the 10-pound block of cheese, then cut 1-pound portions and vacuum-seal each one for long-lasting freshness. Order 50 pounds of flour and 30 pounds of dried beans, then measure out the increments needed for specific dishes and vacuum-seal.

3. Order ingredients that have the widest range of uses. 

Get the most out of your food inventory by selecting super-versatile ingredients. Two recommendations from Gordon Food Service Corporate Consulting Chef Gerry Ludwig, CEC: bone-in chicken thighs and tilapia. With chicken, he says, “you could make cassoulet, de-bone them for grilled sandwiches, or roast them and pull the meat for salads and flatbread applications. Restaurant can use tilapia for entrées, sandwiches, fish and chips, tacos, wraps. You can also serve them simply steamed with herbs and spices. ”It is easy to portion proteins precisely, season or marinate them.” Additionally, you can store any protein for optimum quality using a vacuum chamber sealer, such as the PrimaVac.

4. Vacuum-seal to prevent prepared food from going to waste. 

Calibrating food production is tricky when demand is unpredictable. But now’s the time to be conscious of even the smallest amount of food waste, Ratcliff says, because it adds up. She once oversaw food service for a healthcare system with 65 locations. One of those was notorious for going over its food budget by up to $2,700 every month. Upon investigation, she discovered that the kitchen prepared an extra 11 meals per mealtime, just in case they were needed. With PPPD food costs around $7, the system would have lost nearly $1.8 million per year if every location did the same, Ratcliff calculated.

The solution? The staff was educated on batch cooking and vacuum-sealing extra portions, which can be cooked quickly to meet resident requests. This strategy is also easily applicable to restaurants, where the number of take-out orders can vary greatly! You can perfectly cook meals sous-vide, ensuring food safety and preventing overcooking, and served as needed.

5. Revive wilting greens.

Herbs and baby greens are among the most fragile of ingredients — and unless you grow them on-site, they can be in short supply. Chef Andrew Manning, of acclaimed fine-dining restaurant Longoven in Richmond, Virginia, suggests using a chamber vacuum sealer to hydroshock sensitive greens and bring them back to life.

Place greens in a wide, shallow container. Cover them with paper towels, then add ice and cold water. Run the vacuum cycle twice, which removes air from the greens and forces in cold water. The result: rejuvenated herbs that stay crisp for days.

To read more about ways that restaurants can stretch food budgets further, click here.

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Edlund Company’s KSUV-18 sterilizer used creatively

Edlund Company's KSUV-18 sterilizer being used to sanitize facemasksDuring this unprecedented time, all our factory partners are coming up with creative ways of helping businesses. The team at Edlund Company is no different! They are working diligently to continue to service customers and are in daily communication with them. It was this way that they recently learned about one company’s creative use of the Edlund Company’s KSUV-18 Knife Sterilizer.

Edlund Company received a call from the director of multiple Senior Living facilities, who purchased a number of the Edlund Company’s KSUV-18 UV Knife Sterilizer to keep their knives safe. However, the facilities are now using the knife sterilizer to sterilize face masks for re-use, instead. To be clear, Edlund has never promoted this product for this purpose! However, independent lab testing proves that the design reduces over 99% of E-Coli bacteria in just over 3 minutes. Additionally, in nearly five years of sales, there has not been any complaints related to a failure to protect users’ cutlery from contamination, when used according to our recommended procedures.

As the only U.S. supplier of this type of product, Edlund has recorded sales to schools, hospitals, and cruise ships. With many forms of bacteria potentially present in all types of food service operations, it stands to reason that the KSUV-18 might also be successful in sanitizing and protecting more than just knives and related small equipment.

Additionally, Edlund Company is the ONLY company manufacturing this unique product in our factory in Vermont, U.S.A.!

Please contact us to obtain more information about the use of UV-C light as a method of sanitizing! We are here to help and so are our factory partners!

 

Fudgy Brownies to cheer you up!

Fudgy Brownies made using Hamilton Beach Commercial Stand Mixer CPM800Amid all the things that are going on in the world right now, we thought we would take some time to cheer you up a little, and share the recipe for these delicious fudgy brownies!

In this recipe, dark cocoa powder and bittersweet chocolate truly elevates an old favorite, and with a deep, bittersweet taste, they’re the perfect ending to a meal!

For best results, we recommend using the Hamilton Beach CPM800 stand mixer!

Fudgy Brownies (Yields 30 brownies)
Ingredients:
2 cups (250 g)       all-purpose flour
½ cup  (43 g)         dark cocoa powder
2 cup (454 g)         unsalted butter, cubed
12 oz (340 g)         bittersweet chocolate, chopped
1 cup (200 g)         granulated sugar
1 cup (220 g)         packed light brown sugar
4 large (200 g)       eggs
2 tsp (8 ml)            vanilla extract
½ tsp (3 g)             salt
Instructions:
1. Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C) with a rack set in the middle position. Lightly spray a 13-by-9-inch (33-by-23-centimeter) baking pan with cooking spray and line with parchment paper, extending the edges outside the pan.
2. In a medium bowl, stir together flour and cocoa powder. Set aside.
3. In a double boiler over medium heat, heat butter and chocolate until melted, stirring occasionally.
4. In the mixing bowl of the CPM800 stand mixer fitted with the flat beater attachment and the splash guard installed, add sugars, eggs, vanilla extract, and salt. Beat on medium speed for 1 minute.
5. Add the chocolate mixture. Continue beating until blended, about 1 minute.
6. Reduce the mixer speed to low and add the flour mixture. Slowly increase the mixer speed to medium and beat until blended.
7. Pour the batter into the prepared pan and spread evenly. Bake until the top is shiny and a cake tester comes out with a few crumbs attached, 50-55 minutes. Let the brownies cool in the pan on a wire rack.
8. Using the edges of the parchment paper, lift the brownies out of the pan and place on a cutting board. Cut into wedges or squares to serve.
Original recipe courtesy of Hamilton Beach. To see more, you can click here!

Hamilton Beach – Savory Cocktails Taking Over?

The spicy cocktail is inAs were learning more about the adverse effects of sugar, it is not surprising that interest in low-sugar and/or savory cocktails is on the rise. In many cases they have replaced sweet cocktails made with syrup and fruit juices. Join us, as the team at Hamilton Beach Commercial explores some savory cocktails that do not need sugar to be delicious.

  1. 1. Herbal Cocktails

“To infuse drinks with herbs, the only tool you’ll need is a blender,” Eater advises. Demario Wallace, the bar manager at Aziza in Atlanta, likes to blend herbs with chilled vermouth. Let the vermouth rest, and then strain. A high-performance commercial blender from Hamilton Beach gives you perfectly consistent results for your savory cocktails.

Another effective — and fast — way to add fresh herbal flavors is by using a commercial vacuum chamber sealer, like the PrimaVac™ line. When the air is removed from a simple syrup mixture, it can be heated sous vide to infuse delicate, fresh ingredients like chamomile, mint, lavender, lemongrass or tarragon. Read more about making sous vide-infused cocktails.

 

  1. Fermented Cocktails

Pickle-juice cocktails are having a moment, whether made with pickle-flavored liquor or the salty brine itself. But the classic cucumber pickle is just one facet of the fermentation trend. Bartenders are pickling other vegetables, like beets and watermelon rind. You’ve undoubtedly seen kombucha on the cocktail menu, but what about koji? This humble fungus is used to make sake and miso. Ryan Chetiyawardana used it to add floral notes to the Scotch-based Koji Hardshake at his legendary (now closed) Dandelyan bar in London.

  1. Spicy Cocktails 

The simplest way to add heat to a cocktail is by adding some fresh hot peppers to the mix. Just be aware that the heat level depends on the intensity of the pepper and the process. Shaking a few jalapeno slices with ice results in a pleasant spiciness. Blending a whole habanero might result in a tongue-searing drink.

Remember: “A cocktail is like a bowl of gumbo: You want to be able to taste all the elements, not just heat,” said Ryan Iriarte of New Orleans’ High Hat. He likes Tabasco sauce, which adds vinegary notes. You may need a tiny touch of sweetness to balance the heat. Check out Belle Isle Honey Habanero Moonshine, which is made in Virginia, near Hamilton Beach Commercial’s headquarters.

 

To read the full article head to the Hamilton Beach Commercial Blog for the “Shaken, but not Sweet” post.

A toast to BIRRATEQUE™- a Luigi Bormioli collection

BIRRATEQUE™- a Luigi Bormioli collection of glassware created specifically for beerIf you are anything like us, then it feels like 2020 is FLYING by! Soon we will be celebrating St. Patrick’s Day with all manner of parades, festivals and of course – beer! The BIRRATEQUE™ collection from Luigi Bormioli – a Bauscher Hepp brand – can help you and your guests celebrate with style! 

Every type of beer has unique characteristics, and for this reason each specific type of beer should be served in the appropriate glass. This will allow all it’s features to be emphasized. The shapes and dimensions of this new glassware collection are the results of studies, research, and tests:

• Glass shape and glass quality influence the color, aroma, and the taste of beer. The glass shape must match the type of beer that is poured into it.
• The right glass will bring forward the true flavors of the beer. (This is much the same for wine glasses).
• The internal volume of the glass must be greater than that of the beer poured into it in order to create an adequate aromatic chamber (head space).

Only in this way it will be possible to experience the true aromas of the beer.  On the contrary, if the glass is filled up to the rim the aromatic molecules of the beer will drift out and vanish in the surrounding environment and its flavor will be distorted.

The BIRRATEQUE™ collection from Luigi Bormioli uses unique shapes and dimensions to ensure the best possible presentation of color, aroma, and taste of beer, so whether you choose to toast with a pilsner or a cider this St. Patrick’s Day, there is a glass for every type!

Éirinn go Brách

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Pantone Color of the Year in your operation

Options for how to incorporate Pantone Color of the year into your F & B operationsEach year, as it has for the past 20 years, the Pantone Color Institute selects it’s Color of The Year.

This year the Pantone Color of the Year is: Classic Blue, which is a cool shade reminiscent of the wide-open twilight sky.

The Pantone Color Institute is a 20-person team. The team spends months each year studying recurring patterns or colors, and measuring the cultural zeitgeist. They then select the color they think best captures the current moment and mood for the upcoming year. On-trend business and industries will incorporate the year’s shade into their interior design.

If you’re looking to mix this timeless shade into your dining room, consider some of the latest decors from Bauscher or Tafelstern. You could also consider the Nadia tumblers and bowls from Vidivi to add a pop of color to your table scape!

Bauscher Hepp