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Hamilton Beach – Savory Cocktails Taking Over?

Hamilton Beach – Savory Cocktails Taking Over?

The spicy cocktail is inAs were learning more about the adverse effects of sugar, it is not surprising that interest in low-sugar and/or savory cocktails is on the rise. In many cases they have replaced sweet cocktails made with syrup and fruit juices. Join us, as the team at Hamilton Beach Commercial explores some savory cocktails that do not need sugar to be delicious.

  1. 1. Herbal Cocktails

“To infuse drinks with herbs, the only tool you’ll need is a blender,” Eater advises. Demario Wallace, the bar manager at Aziza in Atlanta, likes to blend herbs with chilled vermouth. Let the vermouth rest, and then strain. A high-performance commercial blender from Hamilton Beach gives you perfectly consistent results for your savory cocktails.

Another effective — and fast — way to add fresh herbal flavors is by using a commercial vacuum chamber sealer, like the PrimaVac™ line. When the air is removed from a simple syrup mixture, it can be heated sous vide to infuse delicate, fresh ingredients like chamomile, mint, lavender, lemongrass or tarragon. Read more about making sous vide-infused cocktails.

 

  1. Fermented Cocktails

Pickle-juice cocktails are having a moment, whether made with pickle-flavored liquor or the salty brine itself. But the classic cucumber pickle is just one facet of the fermentation trend. Bartenders are pickling other vegetables, like beets and watermelon rind. You’ve undoubtedly seen kombucha on the cocktail menu, but what about koji? This humble fungus is used to make sake and miso. Ryan Chetiyawardana used it to add floral notes to the Scotch-based Koji Hardshake at his legendary (now closed) Dandelyan bar in London.

  1. Spicy Cocktails 

The simplest way to add heat to a cocktail is by adding some fresh hot peppers to the mix. Just be aware that the heat level depends on the intensity of the pepper and the process. Shaking a few jalapeno slices with ice results in a pleasant spiciness. Blending a whole habanero might result in a tongue-searing drink.

Remember: “A cocktail is like a bowl of gumbo: You want to be able to taste all the elements, not just heat,” said Ryan Iriarte of New Orleans’ High Hat. He likes Tabasco sauce, which adds vinegary notes. You may need a tiny touch of sweetness to balance the heat. Check out Belle Isle Honey Habanero Moonshine, which is made in Virginia, near Hamilton Beach Commercial’s headquarters.

 

To read the full article head to the Hamilton Beach Commercial Blog for the “Shaken, but not Sweet” post.

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